How many surfers die a year in hawaii

how-many-surfers-die-a-year-in-hawaii-image-3

Oops! Click Regenerate Content below to try generating this section again.

Hawaii has a large number of surfers and a high death rate.

As you may have noticed, surfers are at higher risk when influenced by alcohol or drugs. In addition to that, a large number of surfers die every year in Hawaii.

Surfers get into trouble because they’re often alone on the water and don’t know how to swim (or even if they can swim). Plus, it’s difficult for them to see where they’re going while riding on their boards—so there’s no way for them to avoid trouble when they get lost out there.

How many surfers die a year in hawaii image 2

Surfers are at higher risk when they’re influenced by alcohol or drugs.

Surfers are at higher risk when they’re influenced by alcohol or drugs.

Alcohol and drugs can affect your judgment, ability to swim, ability to think clearly, and communication skills. You might be more likely to make mistakes if you’re impaired by alcohol or drugs. For example:

The real problem is underwater accidents.

How many surfers die a year in hawaii image 1

The real problem is underwater accidents.

In Hawaii, there were 16 deaths from diving in 2015 and 2016, according to the U.S. Lifesaving Association (USA). That’s an average of one end every three weeks—more than any other state or country on Earth!

The same holds for Mexico: In 2013 alone, there were 33 deaths due to diving accidents; in 2014, this number grew to 40; and last year, it climbed again—to 46 people who died while scuba diving into their pool water (yes).

How many surfers die a year in hawaii image 0

When surfing in Mexico, you are more likely to drown than die of hypothermia.

When surfing in Mexico, you are more likely to drown than die of hypothermia.

Mexico has a high risk of drowning because its surf breaks are not very big and often have rip currents that can pull you out into the open ocean. The water is also shallow and warm, so it’s easy for swimmers to get caught up in undertow currents that push them back toward shore. These conditions make it easy for people not experienced at swimming or paddling boats to be swept away by powerful waves or currents—and they can happen even when there isn’t much swell (or “surf”). In addition, Mexico has many rivers and streams where people swim or canoe during their daily routines; these waterways get flooded when heavy rains fall on top of them during monsoon season (September through November). This means that if you’re caught in one such river while trying something like SUPing off your board by yourself without any lifeguards nearby…well…you’ll probably end up getting stuck under all those rushing waters until someone finds/rescues/stabs at least one body part before turning around themselves too!

Learn how to keep yourself safe while you surf, or don’t surf

Oops! Click Regenerate Content below to try generating this section again.

Rating
( No ratings yet )
Loading...